Located in the west of the country and along the border with Botswana, Hwange is Zimbabwe’s largest national park, at 14,600 sqkm. With a population of approximately 45,000 Elephants, Hwange hosts one of the highest concentrations in the continent. They can be easily seen in the […]

Hwange

Located in the west of the country and along the border with Botswana, Hwange is Zimbabwe’s largest national park, at 14,600 sqkm. With a population of approximately 45,000 Elephants, Hwange hosts one of the highest concentrations in the continent. They can be easily seen in the dry season in large numbers gathering at the many waterholes and pans scattered throughout the park, and are one of the park’s main attractions. The park is also home to an amazing variety of mammals, ranging from Lions, Leopards and Cheetahs to beautiful antelopes such as Sable and Roan. Lions are particularly prominent in the park, including magnificent dark-maned males. During the dry season it is common to see Lions feeding on dead Elephants or even hunting them sometimes, when they find a weak or vulnerable one. 
The geography of the park is mainly constituted by two zones, the mopane woodlands in the north and the Kalahari scrublands in the south-west. After being wiped out by white hunters, wildlife populations increased dramatically when sixty artificial water pans were created to support the park during the dry season. Elephants and Buffalos were now able to remain in the park throughout the year, supporting the predators’ population. 

Game viewing during the dry season (July – November) revolves primarily around the waterholes and pans, especially in the afternoons. Off-road driving is generally not permitted, except in the private concessions and this is a great advantage for photography.